1982


1982 was the second year for the Formula SAE competition, and the organizers opened a new class called the B&S Class and allowed Mini Baja cars (with Briggs & Stratton engines) to enter in order to increase participation. Four schools brought a total of five Mini Baja cars. We brought two: our 1981 and 1982 Mini Baja cars. Before we entered, we requested to be allowed to compete in the Formula SAE class; but we were told that our cars would be too slow compared to the formula cars. Well, not only did we take the top two places in the B&S class, if we had been in the FSAE class, we would have taken first and third.

1982


1982 was the second year for the Formula SAE competition, and the organizers opened a new class called the B&S Class and allowed Mini Baja cars (with Briggs & Stratton engines) to enter in order to increase participation. Four schools brought a total of five Mini Baja cars. We brought two: our 1981 and 1982 Mini Baja cars. Before we entered, we requested to be allowed to compete in the Formula SAE class; but we were told that our cars would be too slow compared to the formula cars. Well, not only did we take the top two places in the B&S class, if we had been in the FSAE class, we would have taken first and third.

1984


In 1985, the Formula SAE competition moved away from its founders in Austin to the University of Texas at Arlington with the newly expanded set of rules and judges. This was the first year that UTA Racing competed in Formula SAE with a true formula car. F84 featured a continuously variable transmission and a Honda in-line 4-cylinder air-cooled 400cc engine.

Although it dominated the performance portion of competition, F84 finished third in 1984 to the astonishment of everyone there, but returned in 1985 with a Honda 500cc V4 to take first place.

1987


In 1987, engineering advances for F86 included a new student-built Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) system. We designed the circuit, built the circuit board, and programmed it in assembly language using our own theory. The pulse width was calculated based on an equation instead of a table look up. This was the first fuel injected vehicle ever entered in the competition.

During competition, F86 dropped from 1st to 2nd place due to a bad flagging call. Despite the error, F86 was the first Formula SAE car to break the 1.0 g barrier on the skid pad event.

1987


In 1987, engineering advances for F86 included a new student-built Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) system. We designed the circuit, built the circuit board, and programmed it in assembly language using our own theory. The pulse width was calculated based on an equation instead of a table look up. This was the first fuel injected vehicle ever entered in the competition.

During competition, F86 dropped from 1st to 2nd place due to a bad flagging call. Despite the error, F86 was the first Formula SAE car to break the 1.0 g barrier on the skid pad event.

1990


F89 featured an aluminum monocoque chassis. Its large side pods and monocoque design helped it achieve the highest torsional rigidity of any of UTA Racing formula cars.

F89 was modified for the competition in 1990. Besides a new front nose, the Kawasaki 600cc engine was turbocharged and modified to use M-85 fuel. This car won the 1990 competition, giving us our sixth national championship.

1992


F92 held on to F91’s design strategy, which was to design a space frame with an emphasis on space efficiency and simplicity, and optimized the ergonomics within, the overall car weight, and body aesthetics.

F92 featured a turbocharged Honda 600cc with the UTA EFI and M-85 modifications, a new style intake manifold, new front and rear upright designs, and the first carbon fiber composite wheels in Formula SAE History. F92 took second place in 1992 and 1993.

1992


F92 held on to F91’s design strategy, which was to design a space frame with an emphasis on space efficiency and simplicity, and optimized the ergonomics within, the overall car weight, and body aesthetics.

F92 featured a turbocharged Honda 600cc with the UTA EFI and M-85 modifications, a new style intake manifold, new front and rear upright designs, and the first carbon fiber composite wheels in Formula SAE History. F92 took second place in 1992 and 1993.

1994


F94 combined the best of F92 and F93 into one spectacular car. The body is all hand formed aluminum designed by an art student, Richard Pelitier. This car won numerous awards, including Best Engineering Design, Best Use of Composites, and Highest Performance using M-85 fuel. Unfortunately, due to the engine overheating in the very last lap, F94 dropped from 1st to 8th place.

F94 spent two years on display in the Motorsports Hall of Fame Museum in Novi, Michigan. F94 also has been on display at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, and at the A.E. Petsche Automotive Museum.

1996


F96 marked UTA Racing’s second championship title in a row, and an unmatched eight victories in fifteen years of Formula SAE Competition. F96 set a new benchmark for UTA success, accumulating the most points in Formula SAE history, and winning by the largest margin in history. Outstanding handling characteristics combined with good power and incredible fuel economy made F96 a great performer. The turbocharged Honda 400cc engine featured a unique intake system that used a heat exchanger to pre-cool the air going into the restrictor. This gave us an extra 5 horsepower. We called it the “cool can.”

1996


F96 marked UTA Racing’s second championship title in a row, and an unmatched eight victories in fifteen years of Formula SAE Competition. F96 set a new benchmark for UTA success, accumulating the most points in Formula SAE history, and winning by the largest margin in history. Outstanding handling characteristics combined with good power and incredible fuel economy made F96 a great performer. The turbocharged Honda 400cc engine featured a unique intake system that used a heat exchanger to pre-cool the air going into the restrictor. This gave us an extra 5 horsepower. We called it the “cool can”.

1998


In 1998 England became the first country outside of the United States to host a competition, which was aptly named Formula Student. We wanted to attend to share some of our experience with the event, to let them see a top-level car from the USA, and to gain more experience and recognition for ourselves.

The event was held at the MIRA (Motor Industry Research Association) proving ground facilities. F98, with Ken Hassler driving, put on such a show that they asked us to run an extra demonstration lap so all of the judges could come see it. Needless to say, UTA Racing won the event.

2000


In 2000, UTA had a cast aluminum upright in the rear that was tapped with a fine thread without using a helicoil. Unfortunately, it came loose during endurance and we were pulled off the track. We had such a lead that we still placed 15th.

That same year, Formula SAE Australasia was opened for international teams. There were 9 teams at the event. At the competition, UTA Racing put down a record of 1.34 lateral g’s on the skid pad that stood until recently, and won the international category.

2000


In 2000, UTA had a cast aluminum upright in the rear that was tapped with a fine thread without using a helicoil. Unfortunately, it came loose during endurance and we were pulled off the track. We had such a lead that we still placed 15th.

That same year, Formula SAE Australasia was opened for international teams. There were 9 teams at the event. At the competition, UTA Racing put down a record of 1.34 lateral g’s on the skid pad that stood until recently, and won the international category.

2004


In 2004, Formula SAE Japan (now Student Formula Japan) was opened up to international teams. There were 28 teams at the event that year. UTA took F04 and dominated the competition winning almost every event and placing 1st overall. Later two professors from Japan visited our campus, and when they saw the F04 car they said “everybody in Japan fears this car”.

This was also the first year for the UTA carbon fiber composite wheels that were developed by Tim Patek. The wheels are a one-piece solid carbon fiber rim with an aluminum wheel center.

2010


In 2010 we went back to Formula SAE Michigan at the Michigan International Speedway. There were 102 registered teams, with a large international participation. F10 was another huge departure from our previous cars. It used a turbo charged 250cc single-cylinder engine, which saved a lot of weight. With the smaller engine, the frame got much smaller.

The low weight, combined with a full aero package, allowed the car to handle very well at speed. We set the fastest lap time in the endurance, and placed 6th overall.

2010


In 2010 we went back to Formula SAE Michigan at the Michigan International Speedway. There were 102 registered teams, with a large international participation. F10 was another huge departure from our previous cars. It used a turbo charged 250cc single-cylinder engine, which saved a lot of weight. With the smaller engine, the frame got much smaller.

The low weight, combined with a full aero package, allowed the car to handle very well at speed. We set the fastest lap time in the endurance, and placed 6th overall.

2011


In 2011, F10 was converted into a hybrid car. The turbo-charged 250cc single-cylinder engine was supplemented with 3 electric motors that provided an additional 25 horsepower.

Now known as H11, our hybrid car was unable to finish the endurance event due to a mechanical failure, but still received first place is it was faster than the next fastest car by over 60 seconds.

2013


F13 featured an innovative student-designed active aero system, which allowed the car to individually open and close each quadrant of the wings to reduce drag during straight line acceleration, and balance the car when cornering.

The system was featured at the Racecar Engineering Magazine from England, and the Daily Planet show from the Discovery Channel (Canada).

F13 placed fifth at the 2013 Formula SAE Lincoln competition among a field of international teams, and was ranked first in the United States.

2013


F13 featured an innovative student-designed active aero system, which allowed the car to individually open and close each quadrant of the wings to reduce drag during straight line acceleration, and balance the car when cornering.

The system was featured at the Racecar Engineering Magazine from England, and the Daily Planet show from the Discovery Channel (Canada).

F13 placed fifth at the 2013 Formula SAE Lincoln competition among a field of international teams, and was ranked first in the United States.